Return to site

New Study Points to Reason for Cirrhosis-Related Immune Dysfunction

Dr. Soloman Shah MD

Dr. Soloman Shah is a respected Fairfax, Virginia, physician who assists patients with diseases involving the liver as head of Gastrointestinal Medicine Associates, PC. Among Dr. Soloman Shah, MD’s areas of focus is the liver condition cirrhosis, a disease most commonly associated with alcohol use. A recently published article in Gut by researchers at the University of Bonn, Germany, points to the reason why people with cirrhosis experience immune dysfunction.

The issue appears to relate to monocytes and macrophage, two immune cell types, which produce abundant amounts of type 1 interferon (IFN) when fibrosis of the liver occurs. This, in turn, caused them to release interleukin (IL) -10, which impairs their immunity to the intestinal Listeria monocytogenes bacteria.

The findings also suggest that gut microbiota translocation and bacterial-degradation products are delivered to the liver of the patient with fibrosis. The triggered type I IFN expression and signaling results in serious immunity issues. This study may help in creating new therapeutic intervention approaches to IL-10 and IFN receptor signaling, which will better control bacterial infections.

Dr. Soloman Shah is a respected Fairfax, Virginia, physician who assists patients with diseases involving the liver as head of Gastrointestinal Medicine Associates, PC. Among Dr. Soloman Shah, MD’s areas of focus is the liver condition cirrhosis, a disease most commonly associated with alcohol use. A recently published article in Gut by researchers at the University of Bonn, Germany, points to the reason why people with cirrhosis experience immune dysfunction.

The issue appears to relate to monocytes and macrophage, two immune cell types, which produce abundant amounts of type 1 interferon (IFN) when fibrosis of the liver occurs. This, in turn, caused them to release interleukin (IL) -10, which impairs their immunity to the intestinal Listeria monocytogenes bacteria.

The findings also suggest that gut microbiota translocation and bacterial-degradation products are delivered to the liver of the patient with fibrosis. The triggered type I IFN expression and signaling results in serious immunity issues. This study may help in creating new therapeutic intervention approaches to IL-10 and IFN receptor signaling, which will better control bacterial infections.

 

All Posts
×

Almost done…

We just sent you an email. Please click the link in the email to confirm your subscription!

OKSubscriptions powered by Strikingly